Scientists Discover Massive Recent Slowdown in Melting of Antarctica ‘Doomsday’ Glacier

Forget coral reefs and polar bears – they are so yesterday’s climate scare stories. The real big one, the tipping point du jour, is the collapse of the West Antarctica ice shelf and the prospect of global flooding on a biblical scale last reported in the times of Noah. It’s in rapid retreat says every scaremonger from Sir David Attenborough to the BBC’s resident green activist Justin Rowlatt. It is in retreat – a natural process as the Earth slowly moves out of an ice age. But now, new scientific work has found the process at the huge Thwaites Glacier in Antarctica – nicknamed the ‘Doomsday Glacier‘ for the supposed approaching catastrophe of its swift demise – is much slower than in the recent past.

For the whole article.

Scientists Discover Massive Recent Slowdown in Melting of Antarctica ‘Doomsday’ Glacier

3 thoughts on “Scientists Discover Massive Recent Slowdown in Melting of Antarctica ‘Doomsday’ Glacier

  1. ” . . Larsen continental shelf in the western Weddell Sea. Grounding line retreat rates of 40-50m a day were discovered, equivalent to 10kms a year. The scientists concluded that this retreat occurred 14,000 years ago and was 100 times faster than the rate over the past 10,000 years.”

    A peak at sea level rise during that period: https://www.researchgate.net/figure/Sea-level-history-for-the-northern-Gulf-of-Mexico-since-the-last-glacial-maximum-based_fig6_226009421

  2. Where in the paper does it talk about a slowdown? I’m seeing stuff like this;
    “Over a duration of 5.5 months, Thwaites grounding zone retreated at a rate of >2.1 km per year—twice the rate observed by satellite at the fastest retreating part of the grounding zone between 2011 and 2019.”

    It also says this: “Our results suggest that sustained pulses of rapid retreat have occurred at Thwaites Glacier in the past two centuries. Similar rapid retreat pulses are likely to occur in the near future when the grounding zone migrates back off stabilizing high points on the sea floor.”, so I’d expect the rate of retreat to vary a lot.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s