sunshine hours

January 4, 2018

10 Hours of Sun in Germany for December 2017

Filed under: Germany,solar,Solar Farm,Sunshine — sunshinehours1 @ 10:21 AM
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At NoTricksZone the insanity of Germany’s “plan” for saving the worlds from cheap electrcity is on display.

80GW of demand (the reddish line)

40 GW of installed solar producing almost nothing (the yellow)/

10 hours of sunshine in Germany for the whole month of December.



As Jo Nova says:

“Imagine what kind of havoc this kind of energy flux can do. Not one piece of baseload capital equipment can be retired, despite the fact that half of it is randomly unprofitable depending on cloud cover. Solar PV eats away the low cost competitive advantage. Capital sits there unused, spinning on standby, while wages, interest, and other costs keep accruing. So hapless baseload suppliers charge more for the hours that they do run, making electricity more expensive.

They just need batteries with three months supply.”



February 10, 2017

Coal Saves Germany From Freezing (so far)

Filed under: CO2,Coal,Germany — sunshinehours1 @ 7:53 AM

Or the alternate title: Morons Saved By Coal – Betrayed By Wind



August 22, 2016

German Electricity August 2016 – Days and Days Without Much Wind

Filed under: Germany,wind turbines — sunshinehours1 @ 4:27 PM

Sometimes the wind blows in Germany and then it stops for 5 days ….



June 7, 2016

German Electricity June (1st to 7th) 2016

Filed under: Germany,Uncategorized,wind turbines — sunshinehours1 @ 5:13 PM
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Remember the big noise a few weeks back about Germany being essentially powered by wind turbines.

Not so much noise now that wind is 5GW or less for about 6 days in a row.



April 29, 2016

German Wind Farms Paid €500 Million A Year To Stand Idle

Filed under: Genocidal Wind Farms,Germany,wind turbines — sunshinehours1 @ 8:58 AM
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Because of the boom of renewable energy, more and more wind turbines have to be switched off. The reason is power overloading. The network operators must turn down electricity generated from windmills when their power threatens to clog the network. Originally, this was intended only as an emergency measure. The operators of wind and solar parks, however, are being subsidised for electricity that is not produced.

For the grid operator Tennet alone, these costs added EUR 329 million in 2015 – two and a half times as much as in the previous year. The other network operators 50Hertz, Amprion and EnBW had a combined cost of 150 million euros, according to a survey of Wirtschaftswoche among the four network operators in Germany.

April 19, 2016

German Electricity Week 15 2016

Filed under: Germany,wind turbines — sunshinehours1 @ 9:31 AM
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Germany is planning to rely on wind and solar. I shake my head in wonder when I see wind generation statistics like Week 15.

3 days in a row with less than 3GW. (The following chart is just wind electricity production)


April 16, 2016

UHV – Ultra High Voltage Transmission

Filed under: China,Coal,Germany — sunshinehours1 @ 11:31 AM
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China is building a network of Ultra High Voltage power lines to move electricity long distances. They even have plans to build UHV lines to Germany so they can sell the Germans cheap electricity generated by coal.

“There are 2300 new coal plants with 1400GW of capacity planned worldwide”

“China’s proposed investment in long-­distance, ultra-high voltage power transmission lines will pave the way for power exports from China to as far away as Germany.”

While UHV has been used in Russia and other counties in the past, China is perfecting it. The US grid, for example, operates at 500kv or lower.



UHV allows the transmission of very large amounts of electricity with more efficiency. What are the advantages of UHV?

Increased Transmission Capacity: A single 1000 kV UHV-AC circuit can transmit +/-5 GW, approximately 5 times the maximum transmission capacity of a 500 kV AC line. An 800 kV UHV-DC transmission line is even more efficient, with a capacity to transmit 6.4 GW.

Extended Transmission Distance: A 1000 kV UHV-AC line will economically transmit power distances of up to 2,000 km (1240 miles), more than twice as far as a typical 500 kV AC line . An 800 kV UHV-DC power line can economically transmit power over distances of up to 3,000 km (1,860 miles).

Reduced Transmission Losses: If the conductor cross-sectional area and transmission power are held constant, the resistance losses of a 1000 kV UHV-AC line is 25% that of the 500-kV AC power line. The resistance loss of an 800 kV UHV-DC transmission line is an even more remarkable 39% of typical line power erosion.

Reduced Costs: The cost per unit of transmission capacity of 1000 kV UHV-AC and 800 kV UHV-DC transmission is about 75% of 500 kV AC costs.

Reduced Land Requirements: A 1000 kV UHV-AC line power line saves 50% to 66% of the corridor area that a 500 kV AC line would require. An 800 kV UHV-DC line would save 23% of the corridor area required by a 500 kV DC line.



April 12, 2016

German Electricity Week 14 2016

Filed under: Germany,solar,wind turbines — sunshinehours1 @ 9:57 AM
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Germany is planning to rely on wind and solar. Last week on April 8th, wind and solar combined for 0.94GW out of 55GW.

Averages don’t keep the electricity on. They will need lots more brown coal when they shut down the nuclear power stations.


The whole week (just solar and wind). Yes, sometimes combined they generate a lot of electricity.

But on April 8th Germany went almost a 1.5 days where almost nothing was generated by wind.


April 9, 2016

China: 1,000 More Coal Power Plants Exporting Power All The Way To Germany

Filed under: China,Coal,Germany — sunshinehours1 @ 9:19 AM
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1,000 more coal power plants for China. And then power exports all the way to Germany.


China’s proposed investments in long-distance, ultra-high voltage (UHV) power transmission lines will pave the way for power exports as far as Germany, the head of the national power grid said on Tuesday as he launched an initiative for cross-border power connections

Exporting power to central Asia and beyond falls into China’s “one belt, one road” ambitions to export industrial overcapacity and engineering expertise as it faces slowing growth at home. The plan would allow enormous hydropower dams, coal-fired power plants and wind farms in frontier regions such as Xinjiang to sell into higher-priced markets overseas. The “belt” refers to the land route from Asia to Europe, while the “road”, curiously, refers to the sea route via the Indian Ocean.

Talk of exporting power is a reversal for China, which as recently as 2004 suffered rolling blackouts across its manufacturing heartland. But huge investments in power in the decade since, and the construction of a number of dams, nuclear reactors and coal-fired plants due to begin operating in the next 10 years, mean the country faces a growing surplus.

Liu Zhenya, chairman of State Grid, told reporters that wind and thermal power produced in Xinjiang could reach Germany at half the current cost of electricity there. “There are so many resources, but no market. We need to find it externally.”




April 8, 2016

Word of the Day: Dunkelflaute

Filed under: Germany,solar,wind turbines — sunshinehours1 @ 1:43 PM
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Word of the day:

In German, the term Dunkelflaute is used to describe the predicament. Dunkel means “dark”; solar is simply not available half the time, and solar power production is significant for only around six hours a day even when the sun is shining. Flaute is “doldrums” – when the wind is not blowing. So the “dark doldrums” are times when solar and wind power is not available in sufficient amounts.

This chart is just wind+solar for March in Germany. Red lines are periods less than 5GW.


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