sunshine hours

March 8, 2018

Alberta Average July Tmax By Decade

Filed under: Alberta,Canada,Environment Canada Data — sunshinehours1 @ 10:30 AM
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I posted some data about temperatures in Edmonton and Alberta. I wanted to visualize it. So I’ve made a grid.

The source of the data is Environment Canadas monthly summaries.

I’m using Tmax, not Tmean. (The logic being that max temps are the problem)

And I’m starting with the July only average for the decade. (I’ll expand in later posts).

There are 1087 stations with July data in Alberta.

I’m narrowing it down to stations with 25 years of data and data all the way up to 2017 and 80% complate.

Things to note:

Only 29 stations make the cut. Only 1 station has the 2010s as the decade with the hottest July average Tmax.

Only 2 stations have data from the 1940s (none before that).

So … AGW ain’t going to kill Albertans in July. They already survived July in the 2000s.

And there isn’t any stations with old and new data. (By that I mean the 30s).

 

Station
Station No
Records Min Year Max Year pct of data 2010s 2000s 1990s 1980s 1970s 1960s 1950s 1940s 1930s 1920s 1910s 1900s 1890s 1880s
KANANASKIS 3053600 77 1940 2017 98.7 30.4 31.1 28.3 30.1 29.3 28.8 29.3 29.9
CAMROSE 3011240 70 1946 2017 97.2 29.9 31.6 28.7 30 29.1 31.1 31.2 30.9
COLD LAKE A 3081680 65 1953 2017 100 30.2 31.2 29.8 30 29.3 31.4 30.9
FORT SASKATCHEWAN 3012710 58 1958 2017 96.7 31.4 32 29 30.3 29.9 31.6 33.9
CRAIGMYLE 3021940 52 1960 2017 89.7 31.8 33.5 30.3 32.8 32.6 32.7
EDMONTON STONY PLAIN 301222F 52 1966 2017 100 29.8 30.8 27.8 29.2 28.4 28.6
QUEENSTOWN 3035340 51 1967 2017 100 31.9 33.3 31.4 33.8 34.2 32.2
FORESTBURG PLANT SITE 3012652 50 1968 2017 100 31.7 34 30.9 32.6 31.8 31.7
HIGH LEVEL A 3073146 47 1971 2017 100 30.9 29.9 29.7 29.8 29.2
SIMONETTE 3075937 44 1974 2017 100 28.9 30 29.1 29.3 28.6
VEGREVILLE 3016GF0 37 1981 2017 100 30.7 31.3 29.7 30.3
FABYAN 3012515 36 1981 2017 97.3 29.9 32.2 29.7 31.9
LLOYDMINSTER A 3013961 36 1982 2017 100 29.4 31.6 29.6 31.7
ELK ISLAND NAT PARK 3012275 33 1982 2017 91.7 30.8 31.3 29.9 29.4
BRULE BLACK CAT 3060903 31 1987 2017 100 30.7 31 28.8 29.8
PICTURE BUTTE WEST 303N1G3 31 1987 2017 100 33.6 34.6 31.3 33.2
ENTWISTLE 3062451 30 1988 2017 100 29.9 31.3 29.1 29.8
UNIVERSITY OF ALBERTA METABOLIC CENTRE 301FFNJ 30 1987 2017 96.8 31.8 32.2 29.5 30.8
OKOTOKS 303M9JM 28 1990 2017 100 32.8 33.3 29.9
BROOKS 3030QLP 26 1989 2017 89.7 33.3 35 33.2 34
BOW ISLAND 3030768 25 1993 2017 100 33.7 34.3 31.6
BOW VALLEY 3050778 25 1993 2017 100 32.1 32.2 29.1
COP UPPER 3031875 25 1993 2017 100 31.1 31.3 28.5
CROWSNEST 3051R4R 25 1993 2017 100 31 32 29.1
ESTHER 1 301B460 25 1993 2017 100 32.9 34.8 32.3
LACOMBE CDA 2 3023722 25 1993 2017 100 30.1 31.3 28.4
SUNDRE A 3026KNQ 25 1993 2017 100 30.6 31.1 28.5
THREE HILLS 3026479 25 1993 2017 100 30.7 32.5 29.9
VAUXHALL CDA CS 3036682 25 1993 2017 100 33.6 34.8 32.8
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March 6, 2018

Edmonton (two stations) and then Medicine Hat A

Filed under: Alberta,Canada — sunshinehours1 @ 6:24 PM
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I was looking over Alberta weather data (Environment Canada monthly summaries) because some article said Edmonton was warming by some godawful amount.

When I looked at Edmonton weather data I found 23 stations. Some old, some recent, some only running for a few years.

I looked at EDMONTON CITY CENTRE A  – 1937 to 2005 – average of 11.9 records per year. Pretty complete.

I know, no data from 2010s. But the 1980s were hottest.

1980s 4.3
1990s 3.9
2000s 3.8
1970s 3.4
1960s 3.0
1940s 2.7
1950s 2.6
1930s 2.2

EDMONTON STONY PLAIN 1966 to 2018  – 12

2010s 4.3
2000s 4.1
1980s 3.8
1990s 3.8
1960s 2.7
1970s 2.6

2010s aren’t over.

Then I went looking for some old/new data in Alberta with long runs just to get a feel for the province.

MEDICINE HAT A – 1883 to 2008 11.9 record per year. Again, no 2010s.  Tragic that EC let old long stations die off.

1910s 6.4
1920s 6.2
1980s 6.2
2000s 6.2
1900s 6.0
1990s 5.9
1930s 5.8
1880s 5.3
1940s 5.3
1960s 5.3
1970s 5.0
1950s 4.9
1890s 4.7

I’ll do some more like this.

 

November 5, 2017

Trudeau Screws Northerners – expected to live ‘in a giant park’

Filed under: Arctic,Canada — sunshinehours1 @ 2:11 PM
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Trudeau really, really hates Canadians.

The premier of the Northwest Territories says people living north of the 60th parallel are essentially being asked to make their home in a “giant park” devoid of job opportunities.

Bob McLeod told The West Block‘s Vassy Kapelos that his territory has, for a full year, been left to starve economically as the federal government moves to combat climate change.

“I think southern Canada has to realize that we have people up there … people struggling to make a living,” said the premier, who was in Ottawa for several days last week.

There are approximately 44,500 people living in the Northwest Territories on a permanent basis, according to the most recent data, an overall number that has fluctuated only a little since 2007 when there were 43,374 residents.

About 11 months ago, Ottawa declared a unilateral moratorium on new oil and gas drilling in the Arctic — without, McLeod maintains, any consultation with either local government or the Indigenous population. While designed to be permanent, the moratorium is subject to a review after five years.

The U.S., under former president Barack Obama, has also permanently banned oil and gas development in U.S. waters in the Chukchi and Beaufort Seas.

But McLeod says there hasn’t been any real effort to identify a replacement industry that could help support local economies that have always relied on the resources sector.

Northerners expected to live ‘in a giant park’ as southern Canada reaps oil, gas benefits: NWT premier

 

October 28, 2017

National Post Tries to Scare Canadians – And Fails If you Look Carefully

Filed under: Canada — sunshinehours1 @ 10:10 AM
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National Post has published some maps claiming Canada is going to suffer from “scorching summers”.

I’ve hit my online paper article limit so I’ll post the tweet.

The animated gif starts with a scary January, lots of red. And article/tweet predicts “warm winters, scorching summers”.

Note that they are using “mean temperatures”, not maximums.

But if you capture the monthly images , when do you notice about the summer months?

June/July/Aug are not scary and all red. They are pretty high up on the scale (which means the lowest change)

 

And I repeat. This is mean temperatures. Not max. And having looked at the data I know many of the BC cities have a very low rate of maximum change versus minimum.

It is the minimums that are climbing in a lot of cities and the max isn’t.

Here is my original hometown of Kelowna. Tmax has barely changed since 1900 (and in fact dropped from 1900 to 1950 and then climbed a bit since then.

The ratio of Tmin change to Tmax change is 10.8 to 1. Look at the Tmin climb. Huge. 7C warmer.

 

May 8, 2016

Fort McMurray – Jeff Masters – Hot Days Histogram

Filed under: Canada — sunshinehours1 @ 10:31 AM
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The other day I did a post point out that it did get hot in Fort McMurray in April and May.

That post (and this) is using data from Environment Canada for 1908 to 1944.

Remember what Jeff Masters said:

“Fort McMurray saw record daily highs of 91°F on Tuesday and 89°F on Wednesday. The city gets this warm on only about five days in a typical year, and those days are usually in July or August (even then, the average daily high is between 70°F and 75°F)”

I’ve done two sets of histograms using the 75F (24C) boundary suggested by Jeff Masters. One for April/May and One for July/Aug.

In April/May 1944 there were 14 days 24C  and above.

In July/Aug 1944 there were 40 days 24C  and above.

HotDay_Histogram_ - April May - Hot Day HistogramHotDay_Histogram_ - July Aug - Hot Day Histogram

May 7, 2016

Fort McMurray – April and May

Filed under: Canada — sunshinehours1 @ 8:33 AM
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The other day I did a post pointing out that most of the really hot temperature records in Canada occurred 1936 to 1941.

Then I did a post about  Jeff Masters at Wunderground  claiming it never got this hot in Fort McMurray before in May.

I had only found monthly data before 1944. Reader Fred found pre-1944 daily data under the name “Ft McMurray”.

Jeff Masters said:

“Fort McMurray saw record daily highs of 91°F on Tuesday and 89°F on Wednesday. The city gets this warm on only about five days in a typical year, and those days are usually in July or August (even then, the average daily high is between 70°F and 75°F)”

Lets look at the data! Wow!!!!! And this was before 80,000 people and all the UHI moved in.

10 Warmest April Days Before 1944

Date Max Temp C Max Temp F
1939-04-29 35 95
1939-04-28 28.3 82.9
1941-04-30 27.8 82
1941-04-26 27.2 81
1941-04-29 27.2 81
1924-04-26 26.7 80.1
1915-04-29 26.1 79
1931-04-29 26.1 79
1915-04-24 25.6 78.1
1943-04-14 25.6 78.1

10 Warmest May Days Before 1944

Date Max Temp C Max Temp F
1936-05-29 36.7 98.1
1916-05-21 33.9 93
1936-05-28 33.3 91.9
1944-05-04 33.3 91.9
1934-05-25 32.8 91
1944-05-28 32.8 91
1919-05-19 32.2 90
1936-05-26 32.2 90
1940-05-23 32.2 90
1924-05-14 31.7 89.1

For fun, lets look at the whole year.

Date Max Temp C Max Temp F
1941-07-18 38.9 102
1916-07-02 37.8 100
1916-07-31 36.7 98.1
1924-07-02 36.7 98.1
1936-05-29 36.7 98.1
1937-06-29 36.7 98.1
1944-06-29 36.7 98.1
1941-07-15 35.6 96.1
1941-07-16 35.6 96.1
1918-07-10 35 95
1924-07-01 35 95
1939-04-29 35 95
1939-08-04 35 95
1916-06-30 34.4 93.9
1917-07-16 34.4 93.9
1919-06-20 34.4 93.9
1927-07-24 34.4 93.9
1930-07-14 34.4 93.9
1910-06-11 33.9 93
1916-05-21 33.9 93
1916-08-26 33.9 93
1925-06-28 33.9 93
1925-08-02 33.9 93
1926-07-05 33.9 93
1936-06-23 33.9 93

May 6, 2016

Fort McMurray and Climate Change and “Scientists”

Filed under: Canada — sunshinehours1 @ 9:38 AM
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Yesterday I did a post pointing out that most of the really hot temperature records in Canada occurred 1936 to 1941.

Today I noticed that Jeff Masters at Wunderground  was claiming it never got this hot in Fort McMurray before in May.

I’ll just post a few quick facts.

  1. The monthly data for Fort McMurray only goes back to 1944. I doubt daily goes further back.
  2. The really hot years were the 1936 – 1941 years. So temperature records missed the 1936-1941 period.

Here are the ten warmest May’s (in terms of TX = Tmax) in For McMurray from 1944 on.

Year Month Tx Tn Tm
1986 5 34.8 -3 11.6
1944 5 32.8 -7.8 12
1961 5 32.8 -5.6 10
1971 5 32.8 -5.6 12.3
1995 5 32.8 -6.7 10.5
2003 5 31.3 -5.4 9.3
1972 5 31.1 -6.7 12
1987 5 30.8 -6.9 11.1
1948 5 30.6 -4.4 11.1
1980 5 30.6 -3.8 11.2

May 5, 2016

Fort McMurray and Climate Change

Filed under: Canada — sunshinehours1 @ 9:53 AM
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Fort McMurray Alberta, Canada is burning. 1,600 homes so far.

Some people have already started blaming “Climate Change”.

Here is wikipedia’s list of hottest temperatures ever recorded in Canada. 1937, 1936, 1941 …. You have to go to the bottom of the list to find one from 1960 and one from 1961. Look up dustbowl (but be careful … wikepedia and others blame the following temperatures on bad plowing techniques)

Date Recorded Location Temperature
July 5, 1937 Midale, Saskatchewan 45.0 °C
July 5, 1937 Yellow Grass, Saskatchewan 45.0 °C
July 11, 1936 St. Albans, Manitoba 44.4 °C
July 11, 1936 Emerson, Manitoba 44.4 °C
July 5, 1937 Fort Qu’Appelle, Saskatchewan 44.4 °C
July 16, 1941 Lillooet, British Columbia 44.4 °C
July 16, 1941 Lytton, British Columbia 44.4 °C
July 17, 1941 Lillooet, British Columbia 44.4 °C
July 17, 1941 Lytton, British Columbia 44.4 °C
July 17, 1941 Chinook Cove, British Columbia 44.4 °C
July 29, 1934 Rock Creek, British Columbia 43.9 °C
July 5, 1936 Midale, Saskatchewan 43.9 °C
July 11, 1936 Emerson, Manitoba 43.9 °C
July 11, 1936 Morden, Manitoba 43.9 °C
July 4, 1937 Rosetown, Saskatchewan 43.9 °C
July 5, 1937 Regina, Saskatchewan 43.9 °C
July 16, 1941 Oliver, British Columbia 43.9 °C
June 23, 1900 Cannington, Saskatchewan 43.3 °C
June 25, 1919 Dauphin, Manitoba 43.3 °C
July 31, 1926 Fort Qu’Appelle, Saskatchewan 43.3 °C
July 24, 1927 Greenwood, British Columbia 43.3 °C
July 25, 1931 Fort Qu’Appelle, Saskatchewan 43.3 °C
July 5, 1936 Estevan, Saskatchewan 43.3 °C
July 7, 1936 Emerson, Manitoba 43.3 °C
July 11, 1936 Waskada, Manitoba 43.3 °C
July 11, 1936 Virden, Manitoba 43.3 °C
July 11, 1936 Brandon, Manitoba 43.3 °C
July 11, 1936 Greenfell, Saskatchewan 43.3 °C
July 5, 1937 Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan 43.3 °C
July 5, 1937 Grenfell, Saskatchewan 43.3 °C
July 5, 1937 Francis, Saskatchewan 43.3 °C
July 5, 1937 Regina, Saskatchewan 43.3 °C
July 5, 1937 Estevan, Saskatchewan 43.3 °C
July 5, 1937 Carlyle, Saskatchewan 43.3 °C
July 12, 1937 Regina, Saskatchewan 43.3 °C
July 27, 1939 Oliver, British Columbia 43.3 °C
July 17, 1941 Oliver, British Columbia 43.3 °C
July 17, 1941 Skagit River, British Columbia 43.3 °C
July 19, 1941 Elbow, Saskatchewan 43.3 °C
July 19, 1941 Lumsden, Saskatchewan 43.3 °C
August 6, 1949 Rosetown, Saskatchewan 43.3 °C
July 19, 1960 Newgate, British Columbia 43.3 °C
August 5, 1961 Maple Creek, Saskatchewan 43.3 °C

 

April 20, 2016

Polar Bears Are Morons (Maybe Not)

Filed under: Canada,Mockery,Polar Bears — sunshinehours1 @ 11:14 AM
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A study claims Polar Bears are swimming longer, tiring them out and that maybe cause them problems.

The Polar Bear Science Blog points out the obvious:

So, despite what may be implied during media moments, Beaufort Sea polar bears were  not frantically trying to reach the sea ice from land so that they could attempt to keep feeding over the summer – most of their swimming was done during breakup in July and August from one bit of pack ice to another and they showed no evidence of harm from doing so.

What do you think? Do you think they swim like this (avoiding all ice floes):

PB1

Or like this (jumping on ice floes for a rest when they need it):

 

PB2

April 4, 2016

Polar Bears in Southern Hudson Bay Losing Body Weight – Or Just Dying?

Filed under: Canada,Mockery,Polar Bears — sunshinehours1 @ 3:15 PM
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Capture A new “study” blames climate change for making Polar Bears in the southern Hudson Bay population lose weight .

The world’s southernmost population of polar bears has already lost significant amounts of body weight after decades of shrinking sea ice with breeding females suffering the most, says new research from the Ontario government.

“They’re in poorer condition now than they were in the 1980s,” said Martyn Obbard, of the province’s natural resources department, one of the co-authors of the paper published by the National Research Council.

Maybe it isn’t climate change. Maybe the biggest polar bears are being shot.

Northern wildlife officials will meet in Quebec’s arctic region Wednesday to discuss quotas on the world’s last unregulated polar bear hunt.

Hunters who kill bears from the south Hudson Bay population, which includes Quebec, Ontario and Nunavut, have a voluntary limit of 60 bears a year.

But scientists say climate change is starting to affect the population’s health and that the region’s first official quotas should be lower.

None of the various aboriginal communities that hunt those bears say they’re willing to reduce their take.

According to the first report, there are “roughly 900 bears” in the southern Hudson Bay population. If you kill at least 60 (it is after all a voluntary quota) out of 900 and if you are selling those pelts you want the biggest and healthiest bears.

Maybe the survivors (after the biggest are killed for their pelts) are smaller.

Bids for what ended up being the dearest skin, a spotless white specimen that was also over 10 feet in length, started at $7,000 and didn’t stop until they’d reached $12,400—$1,400 more than last year’s top seller, a previous record. It went to Anna and Steve Gao, whose Mississauga, Ont.-based business, Canadian Intertrade JJ Ltd., ships furs to China and elsewhere.

Early this year, word spread that hunters from the northern Quebec community of Inukjuak had killed as many as 70 polar bears last season—an enormous jump over past years and an unsustainable harvest rate for the southern Hudson Bay polar bear population

The spike in kills around Inukjuak is thought to have begun when a buyer arrived in the region and announced he’d pay big money in advance for furs.

If you look at Canada as a whole 500 polar bears are being shot:

Each year, Aboriginal hunters and foreign sportsmen pursuing the animals alongside Aboriginal guides kill some 500 polar bears (there is no federal cap, and that number depends on shifts in geographic harvest quotas and on First Nations treaties). Many of the resulting polar bear skins find their way to market.

 

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