Unwashed Solar Panels Can Drop to 32.4% of Capacity

Just a followup on the 200,000 liters of water to clean solar panels post.

NREL actually tested panels in Qatar with different cleaning schedules.

A 35,000 m2 Solar Test Facility was established at Qatar Foundation, Doha, in 2012 in order to identify solar energy technologies suitable for the local climate, and study the effects of dust and heat. Of particular concern is soiling of PV panels, causing them to lose performance. This study aims to understand long-term soiling behavior in the absence of cleaning or rain.

METHODOLOGY

Four PV arrays were set up at the Solar Test Facility. Each comprised eight polycrystalline  PV modules, connected to identical grid-tied inverters, and operated at maximum power point conditions.

The only difference between the arrays was the cleaning interval:

(i) one week (“high”), (ii) two months (“medium”), (iii) six months (“low”), and (iv) not  cleaned (“never”).

Of course, all arrays were subject to rain. The test period was two years commenced February 2013.

Energy losses of each array due to soiling are shown in Figure 1. The results are expressed as the arrays‟ PR relative to the long-term average PR of the weekly-washed array, ie. the weekly-washed array is treated as the “100%” benchmark. It is seen that:

• The soiling rates generally appear to be higher in winter than in summer, ie. The lines are steepest in the months around January-February, and relatively flat around June-July.

The greatest power loss occurred on the never-washed array, which after 234 days
produced only 32.4% of the DC power of the weekly-washed array

• The soiling rate tends to decrease the longer the time since last cleaning, as seen by
comparing the slopes of the medium, low and never-washed arrays approaching
November 2014
• However dust continued to accumulate on the never-washed array even after 234 days, ie. The line was still going down when it rained in November 2014.

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Cleaning Solar Panels

To go along with my post on 200,000 liters of water per day to clean solar panels is a drone video of solar panels being cleaned (not the same solar farm).

Those panels are pretty dirty.

 

Plus an anecdotal experiment video that claims a 17% improvement in output. (But be careful cleaning your own panels. I read that soap is a bad thing)

UK Green Campaigners Furious!!! Outraged!!!

No shortage of phrases that are supposed to elicit anger at the government … but they just make me grin. Solar panels are subsidized by the poor.

The Government is closing an energy payment scheme which will mean homes with solar panels could be giving their excess power to the grid for free, provoking outrage among campaigners.

The Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy Department (Beis) has announced the closure of the ‘export tariff’ scheme.

It pays householders for excess power that is fed back into the grid, to new solar generators from next April.

The closure of the scheme has prompted fury among green campaigners with Dr Doug Parr, chief scientist for Greenpeace UK, describing it as ‘simply perverse‘.

The Business Department (Beis) has announced the closure of the 'export tariff' scheme, which pays householders for excess power that is fed back into the grid
Read the rest…

Laughable Claim That Canada Could Run 100% on Wind Water and Sunlight by 2050

There is a good blog post on how laughable it was to suggest that Canada could rely solely on wind, water and sunlight to meet our future energy needs by 2050.

Read it.

I plan to just talk about the number of facilities necessary to do this. The blue # is the necessary count. The red at the end is the # needed to be built by 2050.

  • Onshore wind: 34,993 – 5 MW units ( 2240 units currently installed) – ~33,000
  • Offshore wind: 27,242 – 5 MW units (currently no units in Canada) 27,242
  • Solar PV plant: 1690 – 50 MW facilities (currently 13 similar facilities) 1677
  • Solar CSP plants 450 – 100 MW facilities (currently 1 in operation) 449
  • Solar CSP plants for storage 275 – 100 MW facilities 275
  • Hydroelectric: Uses currently built facilities with efficiency gains
  • Wave energy: 26,227 – 0.75 MW installations (currently no unit in Canada) 26,227
  • Residential rooftop solar: 12,992,080 units (currently <2% of units installed) ~ 12,750,000
  • Commercial/govt rooftop solar: 1,383,183 units (currently <2% of units installed) ~1,360,00
  • Geothermal: 50 – 100 MW facilities (currently no such facility in Canada) 50
  • Tidal turbine: 2000 – 1 MW units (currently no units in Canada) 2000

“Lets look at the offshore wind platforms. As one of the two southern coasts, British Columbia would be responsible for close to half of the 27, 242 offshore units needed to achieve our national 100% WWS goal.  As of today, we have zero offshore wind facilities. “

This is laughable. Canada can’t even build a pipeline to carry oil from Alberta to tidewater in many years.

Imagine the regulatory approval … the lawsuits … the lack of skilled trades.

Its a joke.

But do read the blog post for more info.

 

Roadways lined with solar panels may not be as promising as hoped, first studies show

When you come up with a dumb idea and call it green …

“Four years ago a viral campaign wooed the world with a promise of fighting climate change and jump-starting the economy by replacing tarmac on the world’s roads with solar panels. The bold idea has undergone some road testing since then.

The first results from preliminary studies have recently come out, and they’re a bit underwhelming.

A solar panel lying under a road is at a number of disadvantages.

As it’s not at the optimum tilt angle, it’s going to produce less power and it’s going to be more prone to shading, which is a problem as shade over just 5% of the surface of a panel can reduce power generation by 50%.”

“The panels are also likely to be covered by dirt and dust, and would need far thicker glass than conventional panels to withstand the weight of traffic, which will further limit the light they absorb.

Unable to benefit from air circulation, its inevitable these panels will heat up more than a rooftop solar panel too. For every 1°C over optimum temperature you lose 0.5% of energy efficiency.

As a result a significant drop in performance for a solar road, compared to rooftop solar panels, has to be expected. The question is by how much and what is the economic cost?”

 

Four years ago a viral campaign wooed the world with a promise of fighting climate change and jump-starting the economy by replacing tarmac on the world’s roads with solar panels. The bold idea has undergone some road testing since then

 

 

 

Japan Will Need To Dispose of 110,000 Solar Panels per Day!

A mess of panels.

TOKYO —  Solar panels have sprung up across Japan in the past few years, after the government introduced a “feed-in tariff” in July 2012 that guarantees prices for electricity generated from renewable energy. When these panels reach the end of their working lives in 20-30 years, they will create a mountain of waste.

 

By 2020, Japan’s Environment Ministry forecasts the country’s solar-panel waste will exceed 10,000 tons.

After that, the pile really starts growing: reaching 100,000 tons in 2031 and topping 300,000 tons in 2033, the 20th anniversary of the feed-in tariff.

Between 2034 and 2040 the amount of waste produced is expected to hover around 700,000-800,000 tons annually.

The projected peak of 810,000 tons is equivalent to 40.5 million panels.

To dispose of that amount in a year would mean getting rid of 110,000 panels per day.

https://asia.nikkei.com/Business/Technology/Japan-tries-to-chip-away-at-mountain-of-disused-solar-panels

 

10 Hours of Sun in Germany for December 2017

At NoTricksZone the insanity of Germany’s “plan” for saving the worlds from cheap electrcity is on display.

80GW of demand (the reddish line)

40 GW of installed solar producing almost nothing (the yellow)/

10 hours of sunshine in Germany for the whole month of December.

 

 

As Jo Nova says:

“Imagine what kind of havoc this kind of energy flux can do. Not one piece of baseload capital equipment can be retired, despite the fact that half of it is randomly unprofitable depending on cloud cover. Solar PV eats away the low cost competitive advantage. Capital sits there unused, spinning on standby, while wages, interest, and other costs keep accruing. So hapless baseload suppliers charge more for the hours that they do run, making electricity more expensive.

They just need batteries with three months supply.”