Solar Panels and Wind Turbines Are Killing French Cows

BioElectrocution

In recent years, cattle farmers in France’s Brittany region have lost hundreds of cows to deaths that veterinarians simply cannot explain. After running various tests on their land, some now claim that the solar panels and wind turbines in the area are releasing too much electricity into the ground, which is slowly killing their animals.

Although mysterious cattle deaths have been reported in various parts of Brittany, the situation is particularly dire in Cote-d’Amour, where several farmers have sustained hundreds of losses in mysterious conditions. According to local farmer Patrick Le Nechet, his cattle just started losing weight a few years back and many of them ultimately died. The strange thing was that the animals didn’t seem to be suffering from any diseases and the veterinarians couldn’t explain the cause of death. After conducting his own investigation, Le Nechet concluded that the mysterious deaths started occurring around the time that a photovoltaic installation appeared in the area.

Photo: Couleur/Pixabay

“The cows started losing weight, and we’ve lost 120 of them in the last five years,” Le Nechet told Europe1. “It can not be explained, not even veterinarians know what to do.”

After beginning to suspect that the solar panels near his farm may be to blame for the mysterious deaths of his cattle, Patrick Le Nechet conducted tests on his land and found that there were electrical currents of over one volt both in the ground and in the water, three times the accepted threshold for animals.

“There is a direct electrical current going into the earth,” the desperate farmer said. “Watching all the animals die, it’s unbearable.”

Stéphane Le Brechec, another cattle farmer from Allineuc, 30 kilometers Cote-d’Amour, has lost even more cows in mysterious conditions. He started suspecting something was wrong after 37 of his cows died in six months. Today, the death count is over 200 and he is extremely worried.

Photo: distel2610/Pixabay

“I’m panicking. So far, I’ve invested 500,000 euros, I can not pay my bills, the situation is dramatic,” Le Brechec complained, adding that he has identified at least 17 probable culprits for the unexplained deaths, including wind turbines, antennas and transformers.

At this point, French cattle farmers are merely speculating, because there is no irrefutable proof that the electrical current from sustainable energy installations is killing the cows. However, the negative effect electricity has on cattle is well documented. Two years ago, another French farmer from Val de Saône, in Rhône, reported problems related to the electrical current from a nearby industrial area. He claimed that the electrical current sent into the ground by large transformers influenced the health and behavior of his cows.

“When there are power spikes, some cows gather in one corner, others start to limp, calves that felt good the day before, die,” the farmer told Le Progres, adding that many of his cows were also losing weight and producing considerably less milk.

Thibaut Bouchut, Building Advisor of the Sanitary Defense Group, confirmed that electricity can indeed cause problems for cattle farmers.

“The human body has an electrical resistance of 1,500 Ohms, while the cows, only 500 Ohms, not to mention that they are not separated from the ground by rubber soles,” Bouchut said. “Breeders are not always aware of electrical disturbances, and sometime the seemingly-unexplained problems they face discourage them, even if they are competent. Farms close down because of that.”

BBQ Wind Turbine

I smell smoke

A wind turbine caught fire in West Pubnico, N.S., late Friday afternoon, throwing huge, burning pieces of material to the ground.

Firefighters were called to the scene around 5 p.m., but West Pubnico fire department Chief Gordon Amiro said there was little firefighters could do to douse the flames.

“We couldn’t get nowhere near because the blades was still turning, so, and pieces was breaking off the blades,” he said. “So if a piece was to fall off, it would go a long ways with the wind and that. So it wasn’t safe to go nowhere near the tower at all.”

No one was injured.

Amiro said when the blades turn, the tips are more than 100 metres up in the air — too high to fight the fire from the ground.

Firefighters stayed at the scene for about an hour to ensure no one got too close.

Amiro said it’s a good thing it was raining and the ground was covered with snow.

“If that would have been August, we’d still be there trying to put wood fire out,” he said Saturday morning.

CBC burning turbine 19-03-16

windmill 1

windmill 2

 

Laughable Claim That Canada Could Run 100% on Wind Water and Sunlight by 2050

There is a good blog post on how laughable it was to suggest that Canada could rely solely on wind, water and sunlight to meet our future energy needs by 2050.

Read it.

I plan to just talk about the number of facilities necessary to do this. The blue # is the necessary count. The red at the end is the # needed to be built by 2050.

  • Onshore wind: 34,993 – 5 MW units ( 2240 units currently installed) – ~33,000
  • Offshore wind: 27,242 – 5 MW units (currently no units in Canada) 27,242
  • Solar PV plant: 1690 – 50 MW facilities (currently 13 similar facilities) 1677
  • Solar CSP plants 450 – 100 MW facilities (currently 1 in operation) 449
  • Solar CSP plants for storage 275 – 100 MW facilities 275
  • Hydroelectric: Uses currently built facilities with efficiency gains
  • Wave energy: 26,227 – 0.75 MW installations (currently no unit in Canada) 26,227
  • Residential rooftop solar: 12,992,080 units (currently <2% of units installed) ~ 12,750,000
  • Commercial/govt rooftop solar: 1,383,183 units (currently <2% of units installed) ~1,360,00
  • Geothermal: 50 – 100 MW facilities (currently no such facility in Canada) 50
  • Tidal turbine: 2000 – 1 MW units (currently no units in Canada) 2000

“Lets look at the offshore wind platforms. As one of the two southern coasts, British Columbia would be responsible for close to half of the 27, 242 offshore units needed to achieve our national 100% WWS goal.  As of today, we have zero offshore wind facilities. “

This is laughable. Canada can’t even build a pipeline to carry oil from Alberta to tidewater in many years.

Imagine the regulatory approval … the lawsuits … the lack of skilled trades.

Its a joke.

But do read the blog post for more info.

 

Golden Eagles Will Be Slaughtered And Obama Approves

What a shame.

hawk-raptor-100153132

The Shiloh IV Wind Project LLC, 60 miles east of San Francisco, will receive a special permit allowing up to five golden eagles to be accidentally killed over five years. Previously, such a violation could potentially draw criminal charges and discourage private investment in wind farms known for catching birds in their rotors.

It’s not an accident.

“Michael Hutchins of the American Bird Conservancy said he believes the five-year permit for the California wind farm is reasonable … ” 

He should resign in shame.

“An Associated Press investigation in 2013 found that the Obama administration has charged oil companies for drowning birds in their waste pits, and power companies for electrocuting birds on power lines, but it has taken little if any action against wind-energy companies, shielding them from liability.”

 

 

3 Down … 15 to go. Nome Wind Farm.

3 Down … 15 to go.

“Wind power in Nome is taking a slight decline after a wind turbine at the Banner Wind Farm toppled this weekend.

At Tuesday’s Nome Joint Utility meeting, Utility Manager John Handeland said the welding anchoring a tower failed, and the 50 kilo-watt unit was destroyed.

That leaves 15 of the original 18 wind turbines at the Banner Wind Farm still standing.

Handeland explained, “One was destroyed during first the winter. One had delaminated blades. A then a third one was taken down and used for parts. And now this one.””

The wind farm went live in Nov 2008.

(h/t Small Dead Animals)

 

A crew is arriving this week to conduct maintenance on the turbines. One of their top priorities is ensuring all the bolts on the units are tight and the foundations are secured. NJUS workers will work alongside the maintenance crew to gain additional experience in turbine upkeep.”